Luxebeaute's Blog

December 8, 2012

Depotting & Detubing Cosmetics: The 101’s, Reasons, Advice, & Ideas

Filed under: Uncategorized — luxebeaute @ 11:29 am

I have been depotting and detubing my cosmetics for eons. But recently I have gotten a ton of questions in regards to why and how I do it, along with the pros and cons. If you lurk around in youtube land on the subject you will notice there are a myriad of excellent videos on the basics. Since the basics are abundant, I figure it may be beneficial for me to address depotting and detubing from various angles in which don’t often get addressed and based on questions I am often asked. 

 What is Depotting & Detubing? Without getting lengthy and being too repetitive in regards to readily available info on this subject, quite simply depotting is when one removes the outer casing of their cosmetics reducing it to its potted form. Detubing is when lipstick is removed from its tube and placed into a substitute container.

Why Depot & Detube? Although reasons vary the main reason for depotting and detubing (aka D&D’ing) comes down to storage and convenience issues. It can be personal (limited space in the home), employment within the industry (such as a makeup artist), the frequent traveler (who needs to consolidate) or the desire of any woman to not want to carry tons of products in her purse yet desires to have a variety within arm’s reach at all times in all situations and places. Believe it or not D&D’ing can also be a very personal thing; many (be it personal use or employment related) simply enjoy the artistic hobby of organizing in a particular way (color coordinating), mixing products and coming up with DIY creations, or designing new cases for cosmetics… For example, I D&D for the following reasons, both personal and work related:

  • I change makeup often, going from day to night looks and like to have a variety of items on me at all times; this is hard to do if I must carry numerous containers.
  •  I own a cosmetics business and often attend trade show type events; this being the case I have to utilize space and pack all of my inventory in pan form. I also like to carry my own products to parties and other events so that people who inquire can check out the goods then and there, up close.
  •  I purchase a lot of products for personal use and also to study colors and formulas for my own cosmetics line (see what is lacking, what I could do better, how I can tweak a formula or color). Because I have an overstock of makeup, I like to see all items I own; if I remove them from their packaging I can better compare and contrast, as well as remain aware of all I have and use it all. It also keeps me from re-purchasing shades which are too similar, as well as allows me to find “dupes” of high end products.

 So as you can see the reasons are varied and numerous!

What Can be Depotted? How do I do this?Anything and everything! Blushes, shadows, powder compacts, cream foundations, etc. (and of course lipsticks and glosses-just soak in hot water and pour into a container with a lid). As for how to depot items, there are numerous ways, most of which involve some level of heat. For an idea of the best ways to go about it, click here.

 Should I melt my lipsticks or push them into containers? How do I melt them?  This is completely up to the individual. I often do a combo of both, depending on the type of product.

For example, I won’t melt matte lippies or Amplified Cremes (by MAC) because I fear a change in consistency. I don’t like to melt fleshtones because IMO compacting them in this way makes them too sheer on application, calling for many coats. I do like to melt shades such as red because I tend to note the subtle differences in each shade when they are all smooth and shiny for some reason. I also make my own colored lip balms and I love the way they look melted so I always utilize this heat method for them [side note: some lipstick containers, such as too Faced and Guerlain, are just too pretty to toss away so I store my DIY colored lip balms in these!]… For me, it also depends on the type of container I am putting my lippies into – if going into aluminum rounds I melt and if into a sectioned palette I typically do not. When melting, I prefer to throw the rounds onto a cookie sheet and place in oven at a low temp for a few minutes.

How does one store the items they depot and detube?  It’s all about palettes! palettes, palettes, palettes,! Short, small, thin, tall – any and every format that works for whomever on their own individual level.

 Store bought palettes: Hands down my very favorite are those made by Z palette. Sizes and designs run the gamut, making these really fun. They are the only ones I know of in which have a transparent lid, giving organization a fun pop of color as well ($10-$25 depending on size). The Uni palette is an incredibly sturdy and sleek little number which for some reason reminds me of an ipod or mac laptop LOL. It also has a mirror inside which is nice ($24). MAC Pro palettes have magnetic inserts for either blushes or their shadows and these are coveted by professionals ($8). Coastal Scents also sells palettes that look and act similarly to those sold by MAC and are very affordable (prices vary but usually less than $10). Yaby Freestyle Palette is interesting as it has a ton of different inserts and reminds me of a DVD case with a mirror ($21).Japonesque also has a great variety to choose from.

 DIY palettes: Really there are endless ways one can make their own palette, not only saving tons of money but also utilizing major space. I have seen people use pencil cases, tins, DVD cases, and magnetic sheets for shadows, and also pill organizers for lipsticks (using acetone to remove the M-SU lettering on the top). I also put lipsticks into seethrough stackabl tubes.

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